12 ex-Atari women respond to #NotNolan controversy, offer ‘70s perspective

February 12, 2018

The Atari 2600 (originally sold as the Atari Video Computer System, or VCS) was by far the most popular console of its era. It did much to popularize switchable cartridge-based games. Despite many efforts, Atari would never again replicate its success. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

Almost immediately after Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell was un-nominated for a “Pioneer” award over accusations of sexism, questions arose from gaming fans and historians alike: was the reaction appropriate?

They wanted to know: was a “#NotNolan” campaign too quick to pass judgement based on salacious rumors? Or was it a measured response to how the gaming and technology industries look so many years later?

A report from Kotaku’s Cecilia D’Anastasio came closest to answering that question on Monday. For the report, she interviewed a compelling spectrum of women who are perhaps best equipped to speak to the question: Bushnell’s female peers within Atari, as well as female industry researchers and historians. The report doesn’t come close to a definitive answer, and its hesitation to render any verdict on the matter is perhaps its greatest strength.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

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