News & Updates

Enlarge (credit: Walmart)

Walmart may be the next giant to enter the video streaming wars, according to a report from The Information. The retailer is reportedly considering launching its own video streaming service to battle Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. But Walmart wants to undercut its competition by pricing its service at $8 per month—or lower.

According to the report, the $8-per-month price comes from the idea that Netflix and Amazon are more popular with customers on the East and West Coasts. Customers living in the middle of America may gravitate toward a lower-cost option. Currently, Netflix prices its service between $8 and $14 per month while Amazon Prime Video is roughly $8 per month.

Both services have seen price increases recently as well—Netflix raised the price of its top-tier 4K streaming plan by $2 and its mid-tier plan by $1 at the end of last year, while an Amazon Prime annual subscription jumped to $119 in May (Prime Video is included in a Prime membership).

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Google has been hit by a record-breaking $5 billion antitrust fine by the European Union regulators for abusing the dominance of its Android mobile operating system and thwarting competitors.

That’s the largest ever antitrust penalty.

Though Android is an open-source and free operating system, device manufacturers still have to obtain a license, with certain conditions, from Google to


Source: http://feeds.feedburner.com/TheHackersNews

Hackers have breached the network at LabCorp, one of the largest diagnostic blood testing laboratories in the US, millions of Americans potentially at risk.

The biggest blood testing laboratories network in the US, LabCorp has suffered a security breach. The company announced the incident on Monday, the security breach occurred over the weekend.

The hackers breached into the LabCorp Diagnostic systems, but the company says there’s no indication that attackers compromised also the systems used by its drug development business Covance.

“At this time, there is no evidence of unauthorized transfer or misuse of data. LabCorp has notified the relevant authorities of the suspicious activity and will cooperate in any investigation,” it said, in its statement.

LabCorp did not share further details about the security breach, in response to the incident the company shut down part of its infrastructure.

“LabCorp immediately took certain systems offline as part of its comprehensive response to contain the activity,” the firm said in 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Comission.

“This temporarily affected test processing and customer access to test results over the weekend. Work has been ongoing to restore full system functionality as quickly as possible, testing operations have substantially resumed today, and we anticipate that additional systems and functions will be restored through the next several days,” 

Biggest Blood Testing Laboratories LabCorp

Mike Thomas, a technologist at LabCorp, works with patient samples at the company’s location in Burlington. JULIE KNIGHT – Source www.bizjournals.com

The company is currently testing operations that have been resumed, other suctions will be fully restored in the next days, meantime some customers may face brief delays.

“We anticipate that additional systems and functions will be restored throughout the next several days,” it added. “Some customers of LabCorp Diagnostics may experience brief delays in receiving results as we complete that process.”

The hack might have severe consequences for millions of Americans due to the potential extent of the breached networks that connects thousands of hospitals and testing facility offices worldwide.

window._mNHandle = window._mNHandle || {};
window._mNHandle.queue = window._mNHandle.queue || [];
medianet_versionId = “3121199”;

try {
window._mNHandle.queue.push(function () {
window._mNDetails.loadTag(“762221962”, “300×250”, “762221962”);
});
}
catch (error) {}

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – LabCorp, Data breach)


The post US Biggest Blood Testing Laboratories LabCorp suffered a security breach appeared first on Security Affairs.

Source: Security affairs

Enlarge / New Shepard on the launch pad the morning of Mission 8, April 29, 2018. (credit: Blue Origin)

As it continues to progress toward human flights, Blue Origin will perform another potentially dangerous uncrewed test today of its New Shepard rocket and spacecraft. Although it has not yet provided details, the company says it will fly “a high altitude escape motor test—pushing the rocket to its limits.” The test is scheduled to begin at 10 am EDT (14:00 UTC) at the company’s West Texas launch site. (Update: the time has slipped to 11am ET).

This is the ninth test of the reusable New Shepard system and the third in which it has included commercial payloads on its short suborbital flights. This time, the company is also flying a suite of materials from Blue Origin employees as a part of its internal “Fly My Stuff” program. (It’s unclear at this point exactly how “abort test” and “payload” fit together in the same mission—presumably the high altitude abort will be followed by the New Shepard spacecraft pressing to space, but we’re not exactly sure. Blue Origin will have more details about exactly what’s going on when its webcast starts.)

This is not the first high-energy test of New Shepard. In October, 2016, the company conducted a lower altitude in-flight escape test when engineers intentionally triggered the spacecraft’s launch abort system at about 45 seconds after launch and an altitude of 16,000 feet. Such systems are designed to fire quickly and separate the crew capsule from the booster during an emergency.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Enlarge (credit: Zeng et al.)

Billions of people—and a growing number of autonomous vehicles—rely on mobile navigation services from Google, Uber, and others to provide real-time driving directions. A new proof-of-concept attack demonstrates how hackers could inconspicuously steer a targeted automobile to the wrong destination or, worse, endanger passengers by sending them down the wrong way of a one-way road.

The attack starts with a $225 piece of hardware that’s planted in or underneath the targeted vehicle that spoofs the radio signals used by civilian GPS services. It then uses algorithms to plot a fake “ghost route” that mimics the turn-by-turn navigation directions contained in the original route. Depending on the hackers’ ultimate motivations, the attack can be used to divert an emergency vehicle or a specific passenger to an unintended location or to follow an unsafe route. The attack works best in urban areas the driver doesn’t know well, and it assumes hackers have a general idea of the vehicle’s intended destination.

“Our study demonstrated the initial feasibility of manipulating the road navigation system through targeted GPS spoofing,” the researchers, from Virginia Tech, China’s University of Electronic Sciences and Technology, and Microsoft Research, wrote in an 18-page paper. “The threat becomes more realistic as car makers are adding autopilot features so that human drivers can be less involved (or completely disengaged).”

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Enlarge / Phages on the surface of a bacterial cell. (credit: Dr. Graham Beards )

Due largely to overuse, we’re at risk of seeing many of our antibiotics lose effectiveness, leaving us without a defense against a number of potentially fatal infections. People are taking a variety of approaches to dealing with this, like looking for combinations of drugs that remain effective, developing entirely new drugs, and trying to reform how we dispense these critical drugs. (Although the latter may be an impossible dream.)

There’s another option that was under consideration even before antibiotic resistance had hit crisis levels: use something that makes killing bacteria part of its life cycle. Like other cells, bacteria often find themselves victims of viral infections, dying as new viruses burst out to infect their neighbors. If this happens out in regular ecosystems, people reasoned that maybe bacteria-killing viruses would also work in a pneumonic lung. But those maybes had always been accompanied by a long list of reasons why a virus wouldn’t work. Now, a group of researchers has tested it on mice with pneumonia, and none of those reasons seems to be an issue.

Meet the phages

Viruses that specialize in infecting bacteria are often called bacteriophages, or simply phages. We’ve known of some of them from shortly after we started studying bacteria, since their spontaneous infections would leave open holes of what would otherwise be an even lawn of bacteria. We’ve studied a number of them in detail, and some of the proteins they encode have become key tools in our genetic-engineering efforts. And they’re not simply oddities that strike when bacteria are forced to live in artificial lab conditions. Surveys of DNA obtained in environments from the deep ocean to the subways show that, wherever you find bacteria, you also find viruses that prey on them.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Enlarge (credit: Elle Cayabyab Gitlin)

NEW YORK—Racing cars came to Red Hook this past weekend as Formula E held its season four finale, the NYC ePrix. Although the event is only in its second year, the Big Apple is fast feeling like home for these all-electric race cars, and once again we saw championship-deciding races play out against the Manhattan skyline.

But this event also marked a different sort of finale—the end of Formula E’s first chapter as the series prepares to retire the cars it has been using for these last four seasons. When season five gets underway in Saudi Arabia this December, Formula E will have a new vehicle in the spotlight: one with more power, wild looks, and enough battery to make mid-race vehicle swaps a thing of the past.

Formula E’s current reality

Unlike other racing series, Formula E exclusively races on temporary street tracks in city centers, because city centers are where electric vehicles make the most sense. (Yes, the Mexico round is the exception that proves the rule, but that permanent circuit is in a pretty urban part of Mexico City.) Not all of those city centers have proved welcoming; races in Miami and Montreal were one-offs, and the London ePrix lasted but two years. But the series signed a 10-year deal with New York City, and, by building the course around the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal, the impact on local residents from road closures and the like are minimal. (The course itself is slightly modified from last year, including longer straights that increase the track length to 1.5 miles, or 2.4km.)

Read 25 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Enlarge / The seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) hangs on a wall before a news conference at the FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, June 14, 2018. (credit: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A federal judge in San Francisco recently excoriated the government over its improper methods in searching one suspect’s cell phone and in the use of a stingray to find an alleged co-conspirator.

Prosecutors say the two men, Donnell Artis and Chanta Hopkins, were engaged in credit card fraud and also illegally possessed firearms, among other pending charges that also involve four other people.

The crux of the issue is that, in April 2016, an FBI agent sought and obtained two warrants from an Alameda County Superior Court judge: one to search Artis’ phone and another to deploy a stingray to locate Hopkins.

Read 28 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/