News & Updates

T-Mobile USA CEO John Legere announces Binge On. (credit: T-Mobile USA)

One of the biggest selling points of AT&T’s DirecTV Now service is that it streams video without counting against data caps on the AT&T mobile network. But T-Mobile USA customers will also be able to watch DirecTV Now without using up data, the carrier announced yesterday. DirecTV Now is one of the latest services added to Binge On, which exempts dozens of video services from data caps as long as customers are willing to limit mobile viewing quality to about 480p.

T-Mobile also promised to reimburse customers for DirecTV Now for 12 months if they port a phone number from the AT&T network to T-Mobile and purchase at least two lines. This offer consists of a $35 monthly bill credit, enough to cover the DirecTV Now promotional price. This is a limited-time offer and cannot be combined with other offers like “Carrier Freedom,” which reimburses customers for early termination fees when they switch to T-Mobile.

Customers who want the $35 monthly credit must sign up for the new $70-per-month T-Mobile One plans, which have no data caps but impose limits on video resolution and mobile hotspot speeds unless subscribers pay extra. The Binge On data cap exemption is only necessary on other T-Mobile plans that have monthly data limits.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Recently Yahoo disclosed a three-year-old massive data breach in its company that exposed personal details associated with more than 1 Billion user accounts, which is said to be the largest data breach of any company ever.

The new development in Yahoo!’s 2013 data breach is that the hacker sold its over Billion-user database on the Dark Web last August for $300,000, according to Andrew


Source: http://feeds.feedburner.com/TheHackersNews

Enlarge / Oh, the shame! Oh, the rage! (credit: Flickr / Amy McTigue)

In its ongoing war to stop players who intentionally quit Street Fighter V matches early to avoid a loss, Capcom seems prepared to unleash a new weapon: public shaming.

Last night, a new test branch for the PC version of Street Fighter V went up on Steam briefly without password protection. Observant watchers at NeoGAF were able to trawl that update for new content, which includes some balance changes and new music settings. The beta branch also includes this screenshot, which suggests a brand-new penalty for players that quit in-progress matches too often.

“Special icons will be displayed on the Fighter Profiles of players who frequently disconnect, as well as those who never do, making it easier for players with the same icon to battle against each other,” the message reads. In other words, if you ragequit too much, expect people to start actively avoiding your prominently labeled profile during the matchmaking process.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Enlarge (credit: Tom Hilton)

When in March this year Microsoft announced that it was bringing SQL Server to Linux the reaction was one of surprise, with the announcement prompting two big questions: why and how?

SQL Server is one of Microsoft’s major Windows applications, helping to drive Windows sales and keep people on the Windows platform. If you can run SQL Server on Linux, well, that’s one less reason to use Windows.

And while SQL Server does share heritage with Sybase SQL Server (now called SAP ASE), a Unix database server that Microsoft ported to Windows, that happened a long time ago. Since 1993, when Sybase and Microsoft went their separate ways, the products have diverged and, for the last 23 years, Microsoft SQL Server has been strictly a Windows application. That doesn’t normally make for easy porting.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

The exploitation of the CrashDB code injection issue could allow an attacker to remotely execute arbitrary code on machines running Ubuntu Linux distro.

New problems for Ubuntu Linux distribution, the security expert Donncha O’Cearbhaill discovered a critical vulnerability that could be exploited by a remote attacker to compromise a target computer using a malicious file.

The vulnerability, a CrashDB code injection flaw, affects the Apport crash reporting tool on Ubuntu and is present in default Ubuntu Linux installations versions 12.10 (Quantal) and later. According to the expert, the vulnerable code was introduced on 2012-08-22 in Apport revision 2464 and was initially included in release 2.6.1.

According to O’Cearbhaill, the CrashDB code injection flaw could allow an attacker to remotely execute arbitrary code on a system running on vulnerable Ubuntu Linux. In order to exploit the flaw, the attacker has to trick the Ubuntu user into opening a maliciously booby-trapped crash file.

Once the victim opens the file it will inject malicious code in Ubuntu crash file handler that parses the code and executes arbitrary Python code.

“Problematically there is also code which loads the CrashDB configuration directly from the CrashDB field and not from a local file. The code first checks if the CrashDB field starts with { indicating the start of a Python dictionary. If found, Apport will call Python’s builtin eval()method with the value of the CrashDB field. eval() executes the passed data as a Python expression which leads to straight forward and reliable Python code execution.” wrote O’Cearbhaill in a blog post.

The researcher also published a proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit code on GitHub and a video PoC of the attack.

“Ubuntu ships the Apport crash handling software with all of its recent Desktop releases. This repo contains an exploit for a bug in the Apport crash report parser which can provide reliable code execution upon opening an Apport crash file. The parsing bug results in Python code injection in the Apport process. Exploiting this issue does not involve any memory corruption and it is extremely reliable.” states O’Cearbhaill.

The researcher has also shared a video demonstration, showing that it is possible to gain control over the targeted Ubuntu box system using this flaw with the help of a malicious file.

In the video the expert opened the Gnome calculator with a simple Apport crash report file.

Below and example of a minimal crash report file which exploits the CrashDB vulnerability in order to gain arbitrary code execution and launch the Gnome calculator:

ProblemType: Bug
ExecutablePath: /usr/bin/file-roller
Stacktrace:
None
CrashDB: {‘impl’: ‘memory’, ‘crash_config’: exec(“””
import subprocess
payload_cmd = “pkill -9 apport; gnome-calculator”
subprocess.Popen(payload_cmd, shell=True)
“””, {}) }

The code could be saved with the .crash extension or with any other extension that’s not registered on Ubuntu.

“Both of these issues were reported to the Apport maintainers and a fix was released on 2016-12-14. The CrashDB code injection issue can be tracked with CVE-2016-9949 and the path traversal bug with CVE-2016-9950. An additional problem where arbitrary commands can be called with the “Relaunch” action is tracked by CVE-2016-9951.” added the expert.

The researcher reported the CrashDB vulnerability to Ubuntu that promptly patched the flaw in Ubuntu. O’Cearbhaill received a $10,000 bounty.

Ubuntu Linux users have to patch their systems asap.

medianet_width=’300′; medianet_height= ‘250’; medianet_crid=’762221962′;

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – CrashDB vulnerability, Ubuntu)

The post Hacking Ubuntu Linux distro exploiting the CrashDB code injection issue appeared first on Security Affairs.

Source: Security affairs

The exploitation of the CrashDB code injection issue could allow an attacker to remotely execute arbitrary code on machines running Ubuntu Linux distro.

New problems for Ubuntu Linux distribution, the security expert Donncha O’Cearbhaill discovered a critical vulnerability that could be exploited by a remote attacker to compromise a target computer using a malicious file.

The vulnerability, a CrashDB code injection flaw, affects the Apport crash reporting tool on Ubuntu and is present in default Ubuntu Linux installations versions 12.10 (Quantal) and later. According to the expert, the vulnerable code was introduced on 2012-08-22 in Apport revision 2464 and was initially included in release 2.6.1.

According to O’Cearbhaill, the CrashDB code injection flaw could allow an attacker to remotely execute arbitrary code on a system running on vulnerable Ubuntu Linux. In order to exploit the flaw, the attacker has to trick the Ubuntu user into opening a maliciously booby-trapped crash file.

Once the victim opens the file it will inject malicious code in Ubuntu crash file handler that parses the code and executes arbitrary Python code.

“Problematically there is also code which loads the CrashDB configuration directly from the CrashDB field and not from a local file. The code first checks if the CrashDB field starts with { indicating the start of a Python dictionary. If found, Apport will call Python’s builtin eval()method with the value of the CrashDB field. eval() executes the passed data as a Python expression which leads to straight forward and reliable Python code execution.” wrote O’Cearbhaill in a blog post.

The researcher also published a proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit code on GitHub and a video PoC of the attack.

“Ubuntu ships the Apport crash handling software with all of its recent Desktop releases. This repo contains an exploit for a bug in the Apport crash report parser which can provide reliable code execution upon opening an Apport crash file. The parsing bug results in Python code injection in the Apport process. Exploiting this issue does not involve any memory corruption and it is extremely reliable.” states O’Cearbhaill.

The researcher has also shared a video demonstration, showing that it is possible to gain control over the targeted Ubuntu box system using this flaw with the help of a malicious file.

In the video the expert opened the Gnome calculator with a simple Apport crash report file.

Below and example of a minimal crash report file which exploits the CrashDB vulnerability in order to gain arbitrary code execution and launch the Gnome calculator:

ProblemType: Bug
ExecutablePath: /usr/bin/file-roller
Stacktrace:
None
CrashDB: {‘impl’: ‘memory’, ‘crash_config’: exec(“””
import subprocess
payload_cmd = “pkill -9 apport; gnome-calculator”
subprocess.Popen(payload_cmd, shell=True)
“””, {}) }

The code could be saved with the .crash extension or with any other extension that’s not registered on Ubuntu.

“Both of these issues were reported to the Apport maintainers and a fix was released on 2016-12-14. The CrashDB code injection issue can be tracked with CVE-2016-9949 and the path traversal bug with CVE-2016-9950. An additional problem where arbitrary commands can be called with the “Relaunch” action is tracked by CVE-2016-9951.” added the expert.

The researcher reported the CrashDB vulnerability to Ubuntu that promptly patched the flaw in Ubuntu. O’Cearbhaill received a $10,000 bounty.

Ubuntu Linux users have to patch their systems asap.

medianet_width=’300′; medianet_height= ‘250’; medianet_crid=’762221962′;

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – CrashDB vulnerability, Ubuntu)

The post Hacking Ubuntu Linux distro exploiting the CrashDB code injection issue appeared first on Security Affairs.

Source: Security affairs

Enlarge

Nintendo’s Classic Mini NES sold a whopping 196,000 units in November in the US, according to an industry tracker.

By comparison, NPD found that Nintendo shifted just 220,000 of the soon-to-be-defunct Wii U console in the US over the six month period from April through to September. UK sales figures have yet to be reported.

Combined with the estimated 261,000 units of the Mini Famicom sold in Japan in just one week (according to the country’s industry tracker Media Create), Nintendo’s nostalgia boxes are off to a flying start. That will come as as little surprise to anyone that’s actually tried to buy a Mini NES or Famicom in stores, with the console remaining largely sold out throughout the US, UK, and Japan.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Siemens

While we’ve become accustomed to seeing electric cars demonstrate serious performance—Tesla’s Model S P90D can accelerate to 60mph in 2.8 seconds—the mere idea of electric-powered airplanes is unfamiliar to most of us. But the development of electric powertrains for aircraft is starting to gain momentum.

On November 25, a German-made electric-powered Extra aerobatic aircraft took off from Dinslaken, Germany and climbed from the ground to 9,842 ft (3,000m) in 4 minutes and 22 seconds. The Extra handily beat the previous electric aircraft 3,000m time-to-climb record of 5 minutes, 32 seconds set in 2014. Some analysts expect to see electric-powered passenger aircraft carrying up to 100 people on short-haul routes of up to 600 miles (965km) by 2030.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Enlarge / Sex doesn’t work in Ladykiller the same way it does in most modern games.

Christine Love wants to make sex in games more realistic, and that means making it funnier.

“Fundamentally, sex is pretty funny,” Love said in a recent interview with Ars. “I don’t want to play it as a joke. I think there’s a big problem in video games where sex can only be funny, or it can only be ‘Haha! I wouldn’t ever really be horny. We can only talk about titties as a joke!'”

That’s a big part of what makes Love’s Ladykiller in a Bind stand out (another part is its actual full title: My Twin Brother Made Me Crossdress As Him And Now I Have To Deal With A Geeky Stalker And A Domme Beauty Who Want Me In A Bind). A sexy visual novel (mostly) about lesbians on a boat, Ladykiller plays kind of like a “choose your own adventure” comic that takes place on your computer. Most of Ladykiller is spent directing the main character’s conversations into or out of sexual encounters or guiding the sex itself.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

 Cryptolulz666 is back targeting government websites to demonstrate that it is very simple for hackers to bring down them with DDoS attacks.

A few days ago a reported the attack conducted by the black hat hacker Cryptolulz ( ), a former member of the Powerful Greek Army, who hacked the website of Russian embassy of Armenia (www.embassyru.am). He hacked the website of Russian embassy of Armenia to create awareness amongst the authorities, the hacker confirmed me that he used a blind SQL Injection vulnerability.

Now Cryptolulz is back, he wanted to demonstrate that it is very simple for hackers, even small groups, to launch a massive DDoS attack against any target.

Yesterday he first launched a DDoS attack against the website http://italiastartupvisa.mise.gov.it/ belonging to the Italian Government.

It was just testing his own botnet, then later he targeted the website of the Russian Federal Drug Control Service liquidation commission.

The Russian website was down for several hours.

When I asked a comment he told me:

“from my perspective…. this is just low security, and for a government, it’s quite bad” said 

He confirmed me to be a youngster with a great passion for cyber security that aims to spread awareness on the risks.

He launched a DDoS attack leveraging on the NetBIOS amplification technique. NetBIOS is a protocol used in computer software to allow applications to talk to each other via LAN networks.

“A NetBIOS NBSTAT query will obtain the status from a NetBIOS-speaking endpoint, which will include any names that the endpoint is known to respond to as well as the device’s MAC address for that endpoint. A NBSTAT response is roughly 3x the size of the request, and because NetBIOS utilizes UDP, this can be used to conduct traffic amplification attacks against other assets, typically in the form of distributed reflected denial of service (DRDoS) attacks.states Rapid7.

The hacker scanned roughly 10 % of the Internet searching for potential bots to use in the attack and he found 2 million bots.
“which is pretty perfect for amp vectors..” he told me.

He confirmed me to have shut down the site of the Russian government with a single shot and maintained it down for hours.

In this specific attack he other two spoofing server in order to guarantee a stable malicious traffic against the target, and he made this with python scripts.

“I used another two spoofing servers to launch dos attacks with my self-coded python scripts.” he added.I did it to create awareness among the authorities and users of the website.

I did it to create awareness among the authorities and users of the website.
He confirmed me that he will target other government websites in next attacks, always for the same reason.

“you see the government don’t care about security so we gonna exploit it hard.”  added 

medianet_width=’300′; medianet_height= ‘250’; medianet_crid=’762221962′;

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – Cryptolulz666, hacking)

The post Cryptolulz666 continues targeting Government websites with DDoS appeared first on Security Affairs.

Source: Security affairs