News & Updates

Last month, it was reported that the European Commission is planning to impose a record antitrust fine of about 3 BILLION euros (US$3.4 Billion) on Google for violating antitrust laws.

Not just Europe, Google also lost an anti-monopoly appeal in Russia two months back against ruling for violating its dominant position with the help of its Android mobile OS by forcing its own apps and services


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From GPS system to satellite radio to wireless locks, today vehicles are more connected to networks than ever, and so they are more hackable than ever.

It is not new for security researchers to hack connected cars. Latest in the series of hackable connected cars is the Mitsubishi Outlander plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV).

A security expert has discovered vulnerabilities in the


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(credit: Larping.org)

A patent and trademark lawsuit over foam arrows used in live-action role playing, or LARPing, has been thrown out because the Indiana federal judge overseeing the case ruled that he lacked jurisdiction. For defendant Jordan Gwyther, who owns the community website Larping.org and sells foam arrows as a side business, it’s a victory, although a narrow one.

Global Archery, an Indiana company that licenses its own foam arrows for archery games, sued Gwyther back in October. Global Archery founder John Jackson said that the foam-tipped arrows sold by Gwyther violated a patent he owns, and that Gwyther’s marketing on search engines infringes his trademark rights.

Earlier this year, Gwyther took his fight public with a fundraising campaign, and published a video in which he implored his customers and fans to “Save LARP Archery!” That led to Global Archery asking for a gag order to stop Gwyther from speaking about the case.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Martin Shkreli, the infamous ex-pharmaceutical executive known for hiking the price of a life-saving drug, pled not guilty Monday to yet another criminal charge. The charge stems from an alleged Ponzi-like scheme in which he swindled his former pharmaceutical company, Retrophin, out of millions to cover losses of two failing hedge funds he managed.

Specifically, federal prosecutors allege with the new charge that Shkreli and his former counsel, Evan Greebel, conspired to conceal Shkreli’s ownership of some Retrophin shares from the Securities and Exchange Commission. The charge is Shkreli’s eighth and Greebel’s second in connection with the alleged scheme. Both men were first indicted in December and have pleaded not guilty to all of the charges.

In a statement, Shkreli’s current lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, said: “There is nothing in the new indictment that impacts in any way on the flawed theory of the case as applied to Mr. Shkreli.”

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Kaiju vs. jaeger total badass action mania freakout OMG this is the greatest seriously I watched this video like twenty times.

Let’s savor all the things. First, the Pacific Rim 2 movie is actually happening, after a year of swirling rumors. And now it’s being cast, with John Boyega (Finn from Star Wars: The Force Awakens) joining the team as the son of Stacker Pentecost (Idris Elba). That means Mako Maki has a brother! Will she be drifting with Boyega’s character? We have no idea, because no details of the story have been released yet, but shooting starts late this year. In fact, Pacific Rim director Guillermo del Toro has even hinted that he’s at work on a script for the third movie in the franchise.

Said del Toro in a statement about Boyega’s casting: “I am very proud and happy to welcome John into a fantastic sandbox. The Pacific Rim universe will be reinforced with him as a leading man as it continues to be a multicultural, multi-layered world. ‘The World saving the world’ was our goal and I couldn’t think of a better man for the job.” Fans of the original movie loved the way it developed complex, heart-breaking characters while never scrimping on the kaiju vs. jaeger action. Universal will release the sequel everywhere except China—but given that the first film was huge in that country, there will likely be a local distributor. Indeed, Pacific Rim‘s success was largely due to the global market. It was a film that translated well across every continent, and it made most of its money overseas.

Though del Toro will be working as a producer of the new film, the director will be award-winning screenwriter Steven S. DeKnight, known for helming several of the Spartacus series for Starz and for his work on Daredevil and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. DeKnight has also written for several comics, and he has a flair for combining white-hot action with meaty stories. The movie couldn’t be in better hands.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Enlarge / Star Trek Beyond might be good or it might be bad, but either way it belongs in the canon. (credit: Paramount Pictures)

Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE) gleefully announced on Monday that it has been working with Paramount over the last few months to “develop three conceptual technologies” for Star Trek Beyond, the latest in the new Star Trek movies.

In an HPE press release, the company writes: “Without giving any spoiler alerts [editor’s note: I think you simply mean “spoilers” here, HPE], we collaborated on three different technological concepts in the film: The quarantine, the diagnostic wrap, and the book. Each of these concepts showcase HPE’s vision for the future of technology, but are rooted in developments we hope to introduce much sooner.”

That futuristic technology that HPE is promising “much sooner” is related to a product called “The Machine,” which a larger, less-fractured HP promised in 2014. The Machine would use memristors (technology theorized in the ‘70s and built in 2008 by HP to employ flexible electrical resistance as memory) as well as optical interconnects to create a new genre of hardware that was supposed to revolutionize supercomputers and mobile devices alike. The company was sufficiently gung-ho about its R&D to claim in 2014 that it would commercialize the technology in The Machine within the next few years “or fall on its face trying.”

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

A New York man who identifies himself as the “Red Light Robin Hood” pleaded not guilty Friday to a 17-count indictment accusing him of cutting the wires of more than a dozen red light cameras in Suffolk County. This modern-day digital do-gooder has no apologies and wants a jury trial.

(credit: Facebook)

Stephen Ruth, who remains free on bail, was arrested in April shortly after he told a CBS affiliate that he was the culprit and that he dismantled the cameras “in order to save lives.” He said the county shortened the yellow light duration from 5 seconds to 3 seconds in a bid to make more money.

He’s accused of 17 felonies and faces a maximum seven-year prison sentence if convicted on all the charges. He pleaded not guilty Friday in a local court and wants to go to trial for snipping the wires on as many as 16 red light cameras on intersections on Route 25 between Coram and Centereach.

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Source: http://feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index/

Drive-by attacks that install the once-feared TeslaCrypt crypto ransomware are now able to bypass EMET, a Microsoft-provided tool designed to block entire classes of Windows-based exploits.

The EMET-evading attacks are included in Angler, a toolkit for sale online that provides ready-to-use exploits that can be stitched into compromised websites. Short for Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit, EMET has come to be regarded as one of the most effective ways of hardening Windows-based computers from attacks that exploit security vulnerabilities in both the operating system or installed applications. According to a blog post published Monday by researchers from security firm FireEye, the new Angler attacks are significant because they’re the first exploits found in the wild that successfully pierce the mitigations.

“The level of sophistication in exploit kits has increased significantly throughout the years,” FireEye researchers wrote. “Where obfuscation and new zero days were once the only additions in the development cycle, evasive code has now been observed being embedded into the framework and shellcode.”

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